10 Online Safety Hacks You Can Implement Today

Every day you read about major companies, or even law firms, getting hacked.  Talk about some frustrating stuff! It’s even worse when it actually happens to you.  Of course, with the increase of technological convenience comes greater cyber security risk.  One of my personal favorite cyber security gurus and “Shark Tank” star Robert Herjavec recently provided insight for an article that outlined 10 safety hacks that are easy to implement if you aren’t already doing them.  What are those 10 safety hacks?  Continue reading…

Some of these seem pretty intuitive.  Others perhaps not so much but are a good idea.

  1. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for all of your accounts.
  2. Cover internal laptop cameras.
  3. Don’t do any shopping or banking on public Wi-Fi networks.
  4. Ensure that websites are SSL secure (https instead of http) before making financial transactions online.
  5. Delete old, unused software applications and apps from your devices.
  6. Update your anti-virus software as soon as updates become available.
  7. Refresh your passwords every 30 days for all accounts and use unique passwords for each account.
  8. Update computer/mobile software regularly.
  9. Don’t click on unknown links or open unknown attachments.
  10. Change the manufacturer’s default passwords on all of your software.

One of my favorites is the “cover internal laptop cameras.”  I personally used to get made fun of because I would place a sticky note over the top of my camera on my computer.  I suppose it didn’t help that it was bright green (or hot pink) depending on what color sticky note I had handy so it drew attention until I was given a better one (a plastic slider made specifically for this purpose) at a networking event from Cox Business. Now it doesn’t seem so silly after all.

Another one that I know is important, but probably more difficult to do, is to “refresh your passwords every 30 days for all accounts and use unique passwords for each account.”  Holy moly!  Think of how many accounts have passwords these days?  Literally every different system/app/website that you use requires a password! One LinkedIn user listed as a “Cyber Security Specialist” for a software company offered the solution of a program like LastPass.  Apparently, according to this particular individual anyway, LastPass saves all of your passwords in a securely encrypted container on their servers and have many other built in safety features in the event of stolen or hacked data.  This way all you have to know is one password and LastPass will do the rest.  While surely there are other similar solutions out there, if you are interested, you can read more about LastPass on their How It Works page. Sounds pretty cool, right!?! It might help you break out of that password hell.

A little common sense plus adding in these 10 security hacks can go a long way! Do you have any security hacks to share? Have a favorite password protector that you use? Let us know in the comments!

If you are in the state of Arizona and are looking for that solid “friend in the lawyering business” consider Beebe Law, PLLC!  We truly enjoy helping our  business clients meet and exceed their goals!  Contact us today.

All information contained in this blog (www.beebelawpllc.blog.com) is meant to be for general informational purposes only and should not be misconstrued as legal advice or relied upon.  All legal questions should be directed to a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction.  
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Tax Season is Here: Identity Protection Tips!

I have been hearing more and more about people getting calls from people, acting like they are IRS agents, and threatening all kinds of crazy stuff.  In order to help out I have compiled some information that may be helpful to you.

1) The IRS is not going to e-mail you or contact you through social media and ask you for personal or financial information! If you are unlucky enough to get one of these things, forward that e-mail to phishing@irs.gov.

2) The IRS is not going to call you out of the blue and threaten you with arrest, deportation or some other crazy crap if you don’t pay! If you get a call from someone claiming to be an agent, report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

3) The IRS is not going to call and request financial information in order to send you a refund. If you get a call from someone asking for this kind of information report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

4) The IRS has their own legitimate website. It starts with “www.irs.gov“. If you stumble across any website that claims to be the IRS but doesn’t start with the “www.irs.gov” it is NOT the IRS. If you see this you should forward the impersonating link that you find to phishing@irs.gov.

Don’t just ignore these people…  Report them.