Fighting Fair on the Internet: Part 2 | The Loss of Human Connection and Manners

FIGHTING FAIR ON THE INTERNET: PART 2 | THE LOSS OF HUMAN CONNECTION AND MANNERS

MY MOMMA ALWAYS SAID:  Growing up in my household was less than desirable.  I saw all kinds of icky mean things that would have sent most children, according to statistics, into the justice system or result in some other “negative” situations.  I had first hand experience on what it is like to deal with the aftermath of violence…mental and physical.  Oh yes, I could share stories for days…and I did in some on topic college classes to the awe of many.  Yes, times were tough and I ask for no sympathy…I’m way stronger because of it and I think I can relate to others better as a result.  This is not to say that I didn’t struggle along the way.  The truth is, it took me a long time to get to a point where I was able to handle my own emotions and words in difficult situations but I like to think I do pretty well now as an adult.  Not perfect, because no one is, but certainly better at being more self aware.  So what does all of this have to do with “manners” and “fighting fair on the internet?”  Well, in my household, in spite of the serious chaos and desire to act up, my momma always taught me that saying mean and hurtful things was not nice and if you didn’t have something nice to say you shouldn’t say it at all – regardless of the medium.  Of course, back then, there was no internet.  I suspect many of us had parental figures who taught a similar lessons.  Sure, I was allowed to disagree, after all she had a very independent little girl on her hands who was all about speaking her mind (God bless my mother), but if I was going to disagree I had to have real reasoning and I had to be able to articulate it respectfully.  Name calling and being mean just to be mean was not acceptable.  Being a bully was not allowed.

RESPECTFUL DEBATES…A LOST ART:  This week alone I found myself explaining to friends that I perceive the characteristics of good manners and respect to have been lost by society.  Nearly three times this week I have found myself saying “Ah, respect…it’s a lost art.”  Of course I don’t believe this about all people.  I have met some incredible people who could debate respectfully…especially in the legal field.  One of the great things about the analytic mind is that it allows you to see things from different angles.  Oh yes, there is something to be said for those who can articulate and argue positions without resorting to calling each other a “flaming dodo head” just because they see something differently or dislike a particular situation.  Unfortunately, however, I don’t see these traits as the norm anymore.  Where in the heck did the human connection go?  Apparently out the window followed immediately by manners and respect!

DISENGAGEMENT:  In an on point discussion this week I attributed this dwindling of respect and manners to technology and our loss of ability to be human; I mean really human, as in actually interacting with humans.  Think about it…most of our communications now are through some method of technology; and most don’t even involve actually speaking.  Instead of telling someone, to their face, that they are upset…they send a text message with broken language, odd use of capitalization and punctuation, and an abundance of emoticons or you get blasted on some form of social media or internet site.  We have become so reliant on technology that we have almost forgotten how to communicate and often feel really uncomfortable if and when we actually have to talk to someone else.  Do people even call in an order for pizza anymore?  We have all become so disengaged from other humans…

THE HABIT OF TECHNOLOGY: Next time you are out in public, look around at how many people are “together” but are totally or partially disengaged because they are too busy staring at a screen.  Maybe this even happens in your own home?  Until I started raising a fuss about it, and only because I became more self aware of the trap that I was falling into myself, it would be a regular and normal occurrence for myself and my significant other to be sitting on the sofa together, with the television on, but each also be totally engaged in something else online – be it reading an article or playing a game on our phones, tablets or laptops.  It’s a BAD habit!  It’s like one form of stimuli has become not enough…and we need more constant interaction in order to feel comfortable.  But we aren’t the only ones.  According to studies done by the Pew Research Center, “some 21% of Americans now report that they go online “almost constantly”  and “67% of cell owners find themselves checking their phone for messages, alerts, or calls — even when they don’t notice their phone ringing or vibrating.”  With all of this being online and/or constantly checking devices for messages, alerts or calls, it’s no wonder we, as a society, are no longer really connecting with people the way we used to.

WHEN HUMANS DO CONNECT:  Interestingly on point, I recently stumbled across the Liberators International organization who posted a video on their Facebook page showing an eye contact with strangers experiment posing the question “Where has the human connection gone?”  You are encouraged to link to and watch the short video for yourself, however, the idea was to have two total strangers sit and look into one another’s eyes for an entire minute.  The results…smiles, tears and/or hugs…from strangers.  So very amazing…and the facial expressions…so very telling and profound.

TIME TO MEND THE BROKEN:  The more we “connect” through technology and become akin to an individual island with a population of one the less we REALLY connect in a way where real emotion is involved.  The less legitimate human connection we have, the greater the opportunity for an IDGAF (I don’t give a F!) attitude to develop and the more opportunity we create for words and thoughts (mean ones) to flow without consideration for any consequences; for ourselves and for others.  Indeed, with the loss of our ability to really connect and communicate, we have also seemingly managed to lose the concept of manners and respect.  It’s time to figure out how to gain those characteristics back…one step at a time.

EXPERIMENT:  Try unplugging from technology (no cheating) during a time that you would normally “check in.”  This could be at home around family, at dinner with friends, or even just some time by yourself.  See how it makes you feel and what things around you you notice and report back.  I’d love to hear your feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We Rise by Lifting Others…

WE RISE BY LIFTING OTHERS…  It would be accurate to say that I have been a “gym rat” on and off since the late 90’s.  Accordingly, per my fairly typical routine, I got out of bed and drug my butt into the gym this morning to throw around some weights.  As you all are aware, the gym is a great way to keep physically and mentally healthy because of the ability to strengthen the body and release hormones that help reduce anxiety and stress…and I highly encourage everyone to exercise routinely…especially if you have a high stress job; but today I received a different kind of benefit that I often overlook.  Today I received the “warm fuzzy” from knowing that I was able to encourage and lift the spirits of a complete stranger.  I didn’t do anything special other than take the time to visit and share some insight and wisdom on a topic that this person was struggling with and, in return, I was rewarded with the opportunity to be genuinely thanked for my time and probably made a new friend.  This small interaction got me thinking:  It’s amazing how good it feels to rise because we were able to lift someone else up.

In today’s world where it seems that most relationships are based upon superficial communications through electronics, coupled with the accompanying demand for immediate attention and instant gratification in ways that most of us have obtained through learned behavior over the years, it’s important to stop and be remember to be human!  I mean REALLY human.  We all have the same basic needs.  We all have struggles that are often hidden.  It’s important to remember how to, and practice often, the seemingly lost art of actual, genuine, human interaction.  Take time to listen to someone, in person, and, if you are able, provide meaningful feedback.  The greatest gift you can give someone is your time because it is something you can never get back…and the greatest return is the feeling you receive from actually “being there” for someone which is a gift that no one can take away from you.

So in other words … #BEMOREHUMAN.  Practice this in your personal life with those you care about.  Practice this in your business life with the relationships that you value.  What you give out will come back to you so make it amazingly meaningful.

 

 

 

Contract Terms: The Boilerplate Language IS Important

Every day people and businesses enter into contracts for one reason or another.  If you are running a businesses you likely have contracts that you have your customers/clients sign which outline the obligations of each party.  Most people only really consider the “meat” of the contract…you know, the who, what, where and when; but what about all of that “lawyery stuff” at the end?  Many people will put boilerplate language into their agreements without knowing what implications those clauses will have on them if either party fails to live up to the terms of the agreement.  Similarly, people will sign a contract without paying attention to all that “lawyery stuff” at the end because…well, it’s boring and can be hard to understand.  Does all that boilerplate language really mean anything?  Yes!  Especially if the person drafting the contract may have just cut and paste clauses off of something they found on the internet without really understanding how those things would be applied when things fall apart.

Sure, it seems easy to just cut and paste and/or use prior agreements and roll them over into a new situation…but it may cost you more in the long run if and when something goes wrong.

The boilerplate language at the end of your contract are important for a few reasons:

  • They are real contractual terms that have to be understood
  • They impact your legal rights as to the agreement
  • They can actually control or limit the enforcement of your contractual rights
  • They can, perhaps unintentionally, void portions of your contract that you might have already negotiated in your contract

What are some of the “boilerplate clauses” that are typically at issue in a contract?  The following are a few clauses that are important to review:

  • Choice of Law and/or Choice of Forum Clauses
    • These can define the law that will govern the contract which can get sticky if your contract is contrary to this clause.
    • These can define the place that the contract can be enforced which may or may not be favorable to you.
    • These may limit your rights to sue in certain kinds of courts.
    • These may subject you to a certain jurisdiction regardless of whether or not you happen to live or have minimum contacts with that particular jurisdiction.
  • Arbitration Clause
    • This is primarily used to discourage litigation by limiting the right to a trial through a traditional court system.
    • This can be more cost effective way to resolve disputes than going through a full blown litigation.  This is not always the case.
    • These can describe the specific process for proceeding through to arbitration which can be very different that a traditional court proceeding.
  • Jury Trial Waivers
    • A person needs to understand what exactly is being waived in by the clause.
    • A person needs to understand whether or not the clause will be enforceable in the state that the agreement is to be determined under.  Not all states would enforce this kind of a clause.
  • Severability Clauses
    • These usually say, generally, that if one clause or portion of an agreement isn’t enforceable then it is eliminated and all the rest of the contract is still in tact but some states won’t enforce it and therefore the entire clause could be void.
    • Sometimes these issues can be carved out specifically to protect the rest of the agreement.
  • Cooperation Clauses
    • These usually state that the parties are suppose to cooperate, etc. and it seems like it could be a good idea, however, one person’s cooperation might be another person’s demand for additional terms that aren’t in the agreement in the first place.
    • Sometimes these issues can be spelled out so that there isn’t unintentional consequences in the future.
  • Integration/Merger Clauses
    • Think about all of the prior communications and documents that are related to the agreement…is everything necessary and material in the actual agreement?
    • Have all representations that have been made the parties, agents of the parties, etc., all been incorporated?
  • Warranties
    • Is everything listed in the clause true?
    • Are you sure what the implied and express warranties are?
    • Do you need to limit any certain warranties?
    • How does the governing law handle warranties?
  • Damages Clause
    • Do you have a situation where you want to limit the damages?
    • Does the state law governing the agreement refuse to enforce the kind of limit you are trying to provide for in the contract?
      • Estimated damages or liquidation clauses need to be supported.
      • Penalty clauses that appear to be purely punitive (as punishment) are not likely to be enforced.
  • Indemnification Clauses
    • These are good for situations where some third-party might sue one of the parties of the agreement and the other party doesn’t want liability.
    • These are good to have so long as they are tailored to fit the governing law of the contract; are tailored to spell out who is indemnifying who for what; and outlines the process for getting notice of the indemnification, etc.
    • Certain claims cannot be covered by an indemnification clause.

If you are unclear as to whether or not the boilerplate language is appropriate for your situation, and you want to work through the issues, you are encouraged to speak with a Contract Attorney in your area who can assist you.  Beebe Law, PLLC is an Arizona based law firm representing clients in the state of Arizona.

 

Fighting Fair on the Internet: Part 1 | The Internet Sucks!

Okay, so I know that the title “The Internet Sucks!” is rather harsh, but lately that is how I feel.  There was once a time where the internet was used as an actual tool and not a weapon.  I recognize that to a great degree it still a tool because we can share thoughts, ideas, and solid information and we are all the wiser for it.  No longer do we have to go to the library to look things up or wait a year for something to be published.  Now, everything is at our fingertips within seconds and from an educational perspective, this is an awesome thing!  Even from the perspective of being able to share meaningful thoughts and ideas in a collaborative environment makes the internet awesome, especially when it is used for good and positive.  Of course it has also helped us reconnect and stay connected with friends and family who live across the globe…and for me I am thankful to have such opportunity.  Yes, there are countless reasons why the internet is still good – but that’s not what I am talking about – otherwise this would be a short posting about puppies, baby goats, and kittens.  What I am referring to is the other side of that coin…

As I scroll through all of the social media pages that are out there, reading the different postings regarding…well, just about anything someone happens to write about, I find myself being ever thankful that I grew up in a time when the internet wasn’t so poplar.  It seems that the information highways has become the “misinformation highway” and so many have become quick to believe and consequently “like” and “share” just about anything that is posted…no matter how ridiculous it would seem to anyone who actually stopped and thought about what they were reading for a minute.  Mainstream media wants so badly to draw attention that they will highlight situations that really shouldn’t be highlighted, and then often skew them, because it does nothing more than “stir the pot” and generate ratings.  I have often said those that “stir the post” should have to lick the spoon.  Top that off with the keyboard warriors of today who seem to thrive on being malicious turds and you come to realize that the internet has really become a hostile environment and people are legitimately suffering from it in many different forms.  Someone can’t even post a picture of a puppy without someone saying “that is the ugliest puppy I have ever seen” and go on to get into it with someone else over that comment.  who gives a crap if you think the puppy is ugly?  Why does your opinion on that matter?   Don’t get me wrong, I am all for the freedom of speech (and as a lawyer in my line of work I help advocate for it), however, just because something is legal doesn’t mean that you should push the boundaries just to say you could do it!  Freedom of speech shouldn’t be used as a license to be a dick!  At what point did people bypass the Golden Rule?  Further, and on point, not everything that you say (or write) is protected speech…but so many people forget that or have apparently never been taught that lesson in school.  In my best Mr. Mackey voice from South Park “Bullying is bad…mmmmkay.  Harassing someone is bad…mmmmkay.  Lying and making up stories is bad…mmmmkay. Sure there are exceptions – satire and the like…and that seems all pretty self explanatory to me…but perhaps what I consider common sense isn’t so common?

While the shift has been going on for some time it has only been in the last five years that I have really noticed the change.  Perhaps because I now deal with on a daily basis whether it be for work or I have it thrown in my face every time I read any thread, on any post, on pretty much any topic.  True, I could not read…but the inquisitive social scientist mind I have won’t allow me to simply just dismiss it.  As I see it, there seems to be a drastic increase of people who literally take offense to everything.  At the same time there is an equally drastic increase of people who think being a keyboard warrior troll is somehow productive and funny; and somewhere in the gap between the two extremes are those who can find a bit of humor in some good old fashioned ribbing but know when things have gone too far and won’t engage in those activities.  You know they types that I am I am talking about.  I'm just here for the commentsThey are the ones who literally post the “I’m just here for the comments” meme to a thread to show some level of participation without taking a side…  Why is that?  How has all of this come to be?  Why does everyone want websites that allow third-party content to be the “moral police”?  Even if sites were to start being the “moral police” where does one draw the line in the sand?  Shouldn’t society, as a whole, have a duty to raise awareness and police their own conduct?  Is it a fruitless endeavor to try and get people to police their own conduct or do people generally desire to behave in a positive manner but are just lacking in some basic knowledge and tools for real dispute resolution in today’s technological world?  I mean, let’s face it…it’s not like many of us growing up had parents in this particular environment to draw upon for examples of how to handle these kinds of situations; heck, the game Oregon Trail was considered cool technology I was young let alone the internet.

Through this series of blogs under my self titled topic “Fighting Fair on the Internet” I will discuss my personal viewpoints on these questions in a balanced approach in hopes to help raise awareness on these issues; offer discussion points and/or, at least, some food for thought on the related issues; and provide some general legal commentary and tips for what I call “fighting fair on the internet” along the way.  Of course, while I have some level of education in the social sciences, I certainly do not claim to be an expert…but I am fascinated by human nature and it seems to be such a very relevant and current issue in which I have had some level of experience with.  Stick around friends…I anticipate this is going to be an interesting ride!

Cheers!

Anette

 

 

 

 

Smart people will, by default, never be “yes” men…

I see it all the time; business owners who hire professionals that turn around and try to tell them how to do their job.  Some call it micromanaging.  Others call it “big boss syndrome.”  What I know is this concept just doesn’t make sense.  Why would you do that?  Assuming that the quote “It doesn’t make sense to hire smart people and then tell them what to do; we hire smart people so they can tell us what to do.” was actually said by Steve Jobs…I think he had it right.

Smart people, by their very design and nature, will not automatically be “yes” men.  They will question, analyze and reason with any requests that are made of them and, if they disagree with your position, they are going to tell you so and they will not do what you ask them to do if they know it is wrong or is going to bring harm to you in the long run. Professionals are not going to tell you what you WANT to hear…they are going to tell you what you NEED to hear.

A wise colleague of mine once said that the best you can do is advise your client on the best/right choice to make and let your client take it from there.  In the legal world this is true…after all, if the client goofs things up, and you have to fix it, you can look at it as job security.  Right?  I think, however, in a business setting, and you are an employee who has been hired to do an important job, this can be an even harder pill to swallow.  I suppose this is because if the boss screws things up, it could mean that you end up out of a job, or worse, which will make that employee fight harder against “bad” decisions.

Bottom line, if you want a “yes” man all of the time…don’t hire a smart person.  It just won’t work.

It’s Tax Season! How is Your Business Classifying Independent Contractors and Employees?

 

There has always been a battle between the W-2 and the 1099 people who assist your business, however, the federal government and many states in need of additional revenue are starting to really crack down and audit businesses classifications – and hefty penalties can be associated with those (think back pay, taxes, liability for workers comp, company benefits including healthcare, fines and interest penalties). It’s certainly not pleasant to think about…and you will want to be prepared for a potential audit. As the old saying goes, it’s not a matter of IF, you will get an audit, but WHEN you will get an audit.

The IRS has a 20 factor test (Rev. Rul. 87-41 provides 20 common law attributes); the Department of Labor has an “Economic Reality Test” that touches on about 7 elements; and the State of Arizona likes to consider the totality of the circumstances and puts an emphasis on the right of control without any particular single factor being conclusive.

In this situation it is better to be proactive than reactive…it could save you $$$ and possibly even your business. Plus, there are some safe harbors and ways to help address the issue ahead of time that may save you big $$$.

If you aren’t sure whether you have your Independent Contractor classified correctly, and you are an Arizona resident/business, I can assist you in walking through the elements. You can also file an SS-8 Form to have the IRS make a determination for you. That form can be found at the following URL: https://www.irs.gov/uac/About-Form-SS8.

Tax Season is Here: Identity Protection Tips!

I have been hearing more and more about people getting calls from people, acting like they are IRS agents, and threatening all kinds of crazy stuff.  In order to help out I have compiled some information that may be helpful to you.

1) The IRS is not going to e-mail you or contact you through social media and ask you for personal or financial information! If you are unlucky enough to get one of these things, forward that e-mail to phishing@irs.gov.

2) The IRS is not going to call you out of the blue and threaten you with arrest, deportation or some other crazy crap if you don’t pay! If you get a call from someone claiming to be an agent, report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

3) The IRS is not going to call and request financial information in order to send you a refund. If you get a call from someone asking for this kind of information report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

4) The IRS has their own legitimate website. It starts with “www.irs.gov“. If you stumble across any website that claims to be the IRS but doesn’t start with the “www.irs.gov” it is NOT the IRS. If you see this you should forward the impersonating link that you find to phishing@irs.gov.

Don’t just ignore these people…  Report them.