Don’t Let Scammers During COVID-19 Fool You!

If COVID-19 wasn’t stressful enough, now you have to watch out for scammers trying to take advantage of you. Below are a few tips:

  • Watch out for any links that get texted to your phone that promise to track coronavirus (through an app or otherwise). This might be malware designed to spy on you or get other information such as logins and passwords.
  • Watch our for links in random emails talking about the coronavirus. Phishing attempts are running rampant right now. If you aren’t sure about a link in an email you get, don’t click on it. If you aren’t sure about an email that’s in your inbox, simply call the company to ensure it’s a legitimate email and safe to open. Better to make a phone call than be sorry.
  • Understand that there is a flood of disinformation/misinformation about the virus, including remedies, cures, etc. This is especially true among the naturopath/DIY groups. If it is not coming from a reputable source (local hospital, your doctor’s office, the CDC, WHO, etc.) please don’t share it. If you do share information, cite the source that you obtained the information from so others can determine reliability of the information. Remember, anyone can buy a domain and anyone can make a meme.
  • If you receive a call from someone claiming to be from a charity, asking for personal information of financial information, hang up. If you want to give to a charity, go directly to their website. Also, only go to known charities. Just because a website looks like a “charity” doesn’t mean it is. Again, anyone can buy a domain and make a website.
  • If random strangers are showing up at your house, suggesting they are there to do coronavirus testing, etc., do not let them in your house! Ask for credentials/information and then call the organization that they say they are with to confirm they are who they say they are. Remember, anyone can lift a picture or information off of a website and make a fake badge, etc.

Some related reading:

https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2020/03/the-internet-is-drowning-in-covid-19-related-malware-and-phishing-scams/

https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2020/03/18/coronavirus-scam-alert-covid-19-map-malware-can-spy-on-you-through-your-android-microphone-and-camera/

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2020/03/17/fda-chief-stop-using-unapproved-products-claiming-prevent-coronavirus-column/5041971002/

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2020/03/16/army-white-house-issue-warnings-about-coronavirus-hoaxes-and-scams.html

Lexington PD advises of COVID-19 related phone scam

Disclaimer: This is for general information purposes only and none of this is meant to be legal advice and should not be relied upon as legal advice.

Snapchat Story Hit Home With Students

If you read my last blog article discussing how Kids Get the Short End of the Lesson Learning Stick, you know that I think that the internet today has a way of prohibiting kids from learning lessons “the old fashioned way.”  As part of my mission to educate kids (and adults) on the very serious issues that I have seen evolve out of one’s use of the Internet I decided to start guest speaking and my very first stop was my personal home town.

Last Monday I spent my time up at Blue Ridge High School in Lakeside, Arizona giving a presentation to the students regarding Internet use and the repercussions of the same.  This wasn’t your traditional “bullying is bad” speech that most kids get.  This was a full blown actions and consequences from the same speech.  If you want kids to have a clue, you have to tell them why things are bad…not just “be nice because bullying is bad” and use current examples.  Remember, chances are these kids are far more tech savvy than we could even dream of being!

20160516 - BRHS - Junior-Senior - Q2 re Top 4 Social Media platforms

Part of my presentation involves students taking an online quiz.  Out of the 56 students that responded from Session 2 (Junior and Senior students only) I learned that Snapchat was the most popular medium of Social Media being used by the students, following closely by Instagram and Twitter.  Upon learning this I used a very timely article that I just read about involving Snapchat as a teaching opportunity.  I discussed the recent story that has been floating around in mainstream media (e.g. Washington Post, CNN Money, etc.) about the 18 year old girl who was trying to take a selfie, while driving her father’s Mercedes with passengers in the vehicle, at a speed of over 100 mph, just so that she could apply a Snapchat filter to her selfie showing how fast she was going.  According to the articles, the girl ran into another driver causing him permanent injuries and the victim is now suing Snapchat under a product liability theory.  You can read the entire article as published by the Washington Post HERE.  Be prepared to be a little upset over it.

I explained to the students that not only will this girl likely face criminal and civil problems (and fees for counsel relating to the same) but I also talked about how this has become national news; that since she is over the age of 18 her name is plastered all over the internet in connection to her mistake; and to consider the comments that the general public is posting in relation to the article.  I told the kids that people are crazy and if you read the comments, some wanted that girl dead!  Sure it is harsh, but it’s the truth and I told them that this girl is probably the recipient of some serious hate mail because, for whatever reason, that is what this world thinks is right to do.  Indeed, not only does this young girl have to deal with the fact that her actions hurt someone very bad for the rest of her life, and deal with potential civil and criminal claims, but also may have to deal with hate mail…and that her family may also be subject to the same kind of ridicule.  I drove those points home.

Just looking at their faces as I told the story; the number of side conversations that ensued; and the questions that I received from the audience told me they were listening!  They were really listening!

I have been saying for a long time that education needs to happen now and I am pleased to be apart of that process!  If you have or know of a school or youth group that you think need to hear more about this topic, from someone who really understands and can present the information in an informative and entertaining way, consider sending that person this blog article or contact me.  I am currently booking lectures for students (and adults) for 2016 through June 2017.

Until next time friends…

P.S. – If any of this resonates with you, or you agree with that I have said, please consider sharing this article and/or leave me a comment.  I’d love to hear your feedback and/or about your personal experiences.

 

Tax Season is Here: Identity Protection Tips!

I have been hearing more and more about people getting calls from people, acting like they are IRS agents, and threatening all kinds of crazy stuff.  In order to help out I have compiled some information that may be helpful to you.

1) The IRS is not going to e-mail you or contact you through social media and ask you for personal or financial information! If you are unlucky enough to get one of these things, forward that e-mail to phishing@irs.gov.

2) The IRS is not going to call you out of the blue and threaten you with arrest, deportation or some other crazy crap if you don’t pay! If you get a call from someone claiming to be an agent, report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

3) The IRS is not going to call and request financial information in order to send you a refund. If you get a call from someone asking for this kind of information report that call to the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration at 1-800-366-4484 or online at:https://www.treasury.gov/tigta/contact_report_scam.shtml

4) The IRS has their own legitimate website. It starts with “www.irs.gov“. If you stumble across any website that claims to be the IRS but doesn’t start with the “www.irs.gov” it is NOT the IRS. If you see this you should forward the impersonating link that you find to phishing@irs.gov.

Don’t just ignore these people…  Report them.